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After two years of #maker #coder #cogger #splicer and #designer work with the perk of Schmaltz's "Bagel and Wolfhead Salmon" for coming in on the weekend(s), the Magniware team shipped "rthm" today - getrthm.com - a Toronto based start-up that has the potential to redefine how health analysis (DNA + Sensor + App) becomes useful with real-time, relevant health 'tips", all without a "rubber dongle" hanging around your wrist. The free App is all that's needed to start and like all start-ups, ...now the work begins! getrthm.com ... See MoreSee Less

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David Crow, Neil Martin and 23 others like this

Simran KambojKen, can you provide more details on the genetic testing and where you're deriving the tips you generate based on the testing?

14 hours ago   ·  2

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Simran Kamboj

Frankie AbramsWhat is this Schmaltz's you speak of? I think I am genetically disposed to eating it, if I can find it.

5 hours ago   ·  1

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Frankie Abrams

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Wut. Can someone pls explain.. There should be consequences for Ontario grads leaving Canada: CEOs
www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/there-should-be-consequences-for-ontario-grads-leaving-cana...
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Khazret Sapenov, Jaxson Khan and 5 others like this

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Matt BurnsThis is just ridiculous imo

4 days ago   ·  4
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Paul Jeffrey CroweThere should be consequences for tech CEO's that can't convince talent to stay and work for them. Oh wait, there is :)

4 days ago   ·  27
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April DunfordMany members of that council are active in this group. Interested to hear their take on it.

4 days ago   ·  5

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Boris MannW. T. F.

4 days ago   ·  5
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Ian KingThe real question here is how to frame our national investment in education. If we're taking a purist moral stance of education existing as a fundamental human right, then we can not place any restriction on what receivers of subsidized education do with said education. However, that is a deeply naive and fundamentally flawed stance that does not take into account the real politik of global factors at play of a nation existing within a system of nations. Subsidized education is a national investment in our talent development funnel and we need an ROI on our tax dollars. If all the talent we invest so dearly in to develop does not contribute back to our companies and if those grads are not paying taxes to help support our national economy, it's even detrimental to the US who is profiting so dearly from this - that parasitism of our talent will eventually collapse Canada and the US won't have its cheap talent incubator anymore. I've had several conversations with Tannishtha on this in the past. The only comparable initiative that comes to mind are military-subsidized tuitions that are tied to mandatory years of service. Granted, we are not completely subsidizing tuition and so we can't expect military-levels of lock-in yet the degree of lock-in should be commensurate with the degree of subsidies received. The alternative discussion here which I've seen Tannishtha propose in some other threads is that rather than restricting movement, the goal should be to create systemic factors that make Canadian talent want to stay and work in Canada. Nonetheless, this really is a a chicken-and-egg phenomenon - which one do we focus on first? Altogether though, I guess we should end on this note: why are we accepting national subsidies on our education if we're not willing to give back to our country? We take investor dollars and are eager to give them ROI and yet why don't we think this way about our country and its investment in our collective development?

4 days ago

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Matthew YangPunitive measure never work, and all they will do is cause frustration and anger among the targeted groups (university students), and it won't do anything to solve the original brain drain problem. If you want talent, be willing to spend money and effort on attracting them, rather than blaming the talent for leaving.

4 days ago   ·  1

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Pulat YunusovSeparating taxpayers from citizens in general is very Rob Ford.

4 days ago   ·  1
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Wilkins ChungTalent is globally mobile. You're going to fail if you don't recognize this and compete accordingly. Ppl in this article are full of fail.

4 days ago   ·  3
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Mark OrganYeah that proposal is disgraceful. But what do you think of our newsjacking of this article? I think we came out looking pretty good.

4 days ago   ·  19

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Anthony ReinhartIn recent conversations with Canadian expats working in tech in the Bay Area, most told me they would move back if they saw more opportunities here to work on big, meaningful projects. For whatever reason, they're not seeing them. Another suggested Canada's tech companies cannot claim to want to attract top global talent on one hand, while paying discount wages on the other. If we want to compete with Valley employers for the absolute best talent, we have to be willing to at least match Valley compensation, he argued; otherwise, we're signalling to the world that we're not serious about competing. This is anecdotal feedback based on a small number of interviews, so I can't claim these people's views are representative of all 25K Canadians in the Valley. But to solve this problem, we should probably start by talking to the very people this kind of payback proposal would target.

4 days ago   ·  7
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John RuffoloThanks Ian King. This penalty idea is not a policy plank of the Council of Canadian Innovators but the reporter seems to have written it that way. The current highest priority of the CCI is the talent agenda and together with the CEO members are developing ideas to increase the talent pool in Canada through innovative immigration and emigration ideas. Lots of great ideas are coming in and being formulated. One idea I heard bandied about is the double taxpayer hit when we taxpayers educate folks and then they immediately leave Canada. We paid for the education yet lose their economic input. So, in Ontario for example, when the Liberal Gov't announced a broad idea to pay for university education, is there a concept to pay for a students education by the taxpayers in exchange for them staying in Canada for say 3 years. This concept would be more of an incentive than a penalty. But as far as I am aware, the idea has not been fully fleshed out. I spoke to the ED of CCI who confirmed that the only point that was raised was the conundrum of taxpayer dollars leaking out ie. Akin to a churn issue for startups.

4 days ago   ·  5

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Ethan HenryNice work Mark Organ. The basic truth is that you have to compete with companies paying a lot of money. Talent follows the money. Working at Eloqua was great, but making 3x my Canadian income in the US is hard to argue with. And if you want senior talent, free lunches and gym memberships are nice but ultimately irrelevant. People beyond their 20's need higher comp, autonomy and flexibility - honestly not things most Canadian companies are famous for.

4 days ago   ·  3
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Julian D'AngeloYour average grad isn't flocking to the states because they simply can't compete there, my guess is that it's the top 5-10% that are leaving, maybe less. (Though concrete data would be nice.) If you don't have an ecosystem to tend to the brightest minds, you're only holding them back. It's like a junior hockey coach saying, we invested so much into you, and now you want to go play in the NHL?

4 days ago   ·  6

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Mike ShaverMy perspective on this is either informed or tainted by spending 6 years on the board of Canada's largest post-secondary institution, just as a disclosure. I didn't attend a Canadian post-secondary institution myself, but I am reliably informed that they're great. I've hired probably dozens of Canadian grads into positions in Canada and the US. I think that this sort of initiative would meet with substantial resistance from educators. The ones I know *celebrate* their students finding a position they are willing to move a long way for, and one where their employer values them enough to do visa and relocation work. That sort of actualization is a wonderful educational outcome, and it will be extremely challenging to get educators onside with pushing people into "lesser" (as perceived by the graduate) jobs via financial penalties. (It's also not clear that it would work. Companies put claw-backs on tuition when they pay someone to get an MBA, and it rapidly just became part of the calculus of a hiring package. If Google or Microsoft or Facebook have to put an extra $50K Canadian into a hiring package to pay the emigration tax -- I can't believe that we're talking about such a thing as serious adults -- then that's pretty likely to just happen, with some clawback. Existing signing bonuses and relo budgets can easily be 3 times that anyway, and one-off costs for hiring are regarded as below the noise floor in many places.) What these CEOs actually want, I think, is to increase the value that Canadian industry gets out of the Canadian educational system. That's a reasonable thing to want, even if this is a pretty distasteful approach to it. There are lots of things they could be lobbying for that aren't punitive towards people starting their careers by working for a company that is excited to have them. One example: better investment in education-industry research collaborations, especially in the area where colleges have been pretty neglected, and often able to provide more readily productizable work. (Education is actually a provincial investment, so taken at face value this would penalize a U of T grad going to work in Montreal.)

4 days ago   ·  11

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Benjamin BergenI'm the ED at CCI -- In today’s Globe and Mail our goal was to create a conversation around issues of retention for domestic tech companies. I want to clarify that ideas discussed in the article are not official policies CCI is currently advocating. CCI is instead encouraging provincial governments to design policies that will ensure made in Canada companies can grow and thrive and talent is one of the critical issues. There are many different views on how best to tackle it and we welcome all ideas. CCI is simply seeking a dialogue with government to tackle this important issue for tech sector.

4 days ago   ·  5

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Tannishtha Ray PramanickSlightly concerned here that whenever the topic of the great Canadian tech brain drain has come up as an issue to deal with, people automatically assume that anyone looking to rectify the situation is hinting at closing borders/restricting emigration. I get this article is sort of hinting at that, but even in past discussions when that hasn't been hinted at, people have taken a critical stance by calling out a point that no one is making, namely; restricting movement. Relax guys, no one is saying Canada has only one way of dealing with the issue, and that's by becoming like North Korea. I don't know why this keeps happening.

4 days ago   ·  1

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Jaxson KhanPerhaps instead of penalizing students who leave to pursue great opportunities we should focus on retaining the 46% of international students who want to stay in Canada with only 5% being able to. wenr.wes.org/2014/05/attracting-and-retaining-international-students-in-canada/ Retaining international students and increasing immigration is key for Canada to combat the impending demographic crunch.

4 days ago   ·  15

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Rob HyndmanTrain people, give them opportunity and freedom.

3 days ago   ·  3

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Gustavo Melo", where salaries are much higher because of the weak Canadian dollar" - let's clarify one thing, the weak Canadian dollar has little to do with this discussion, if anything at all. Many tech companies in Toronto do business primarily in the US, get paid in American dollars, have many of their employees' salaries partially subsidized by the government through programs like SR&ED and IRAP, and still underpay their talent vs. American companies.

3 days ago   ·  6

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Gustavo Melo

Leo LuoJaxson Khan, you got a good point. Talents will only follow the good opportunities, just like smart money! Your can't really force a mutual fund manager to invest in below average companies, what make those high-tech CEOs think Canadian graduates should spend their life with less competitive companies? The only way to attract talents is to be strong and competitive... nothing else.

3 days ago   ·  4
Leo Luo

Leigh HimelIt's interesting - after a recent trip to grow my business in the US - it's clear to me - the Americans do small business exceptionally well. More supportive, great incentives to open offices and less bureaucracy. I think the Globe article approach just continues the trend towards red tape form filling vs. progressive platforms that will further develop the startup ecosystem and fuel growth.

1 day ago   ·  1
Leigh Himel

Varun MathurThe best and the brightest students sometimes want to start their own tech startup, as opposed to working for one (at which point it is a comparison amongst employers). There needs to be direct incentive to startup here for students capable enough of getting recruited away by the best tech companies in the world. Anecdotal evidence, but of all the maddeningly bright students I have seen locally who went on to work for big US tech companies (and did fantastically well there), they all tried to do a startup here first - couldn't connect enough dots and instead chose the amazing opportunity which the US tech companies offered. These folks run critical stuff at Microsoft/Google/etc now, which is a testament to their brilliance. This talent is never coming back, their companies will fight tooth and nail to retain them -- all we can hope for is for the next generation of students we have a better plan than before of helping them connect the dots towards entrepreneurship locally.

19 hours ago
Varun Mathur

Jana ZaibakI've recently been thinking this: after students graduate from high school, there should be a one-year government funded program that encourages students to start their own company. If they succeed, then great, they stimulate the economy and they find their passion earlier in life, rather than going through 4 years of undergrad that they likely don't need. If their startup doesn't go so well, then great, they only invested one year during their late teens, and now have a better idea of what they'd like to study in university. I just can't help but think of how many more entrepreneurs we'd have if there wasn't a pressure to go directly into university/college upon graduating high school. Canadians start schooling so early, and it's crucial that they take time to explore the world and explore what they really want to do to make a positive impact for the world – and starting a business can do just that. Invest in Canadian youth, who will in turn stay in Canada and stimulate the Canadian economy.

13 hours ago   ·  1
Jana Zaibak

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